Results tagged ‘ Yankees ’

Masahiro Tanaka placed on disabled list with sore elbow

Masahiro Tanaka has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with soreness in his right elbow, Yankees manager Joe Girardi confirmed. Tanaka flew back to New York on Wednesday for an MRI, and the team is waiting for club physician Dr. Christopher Ahmad to evaluate the results.

Tanaka had his worst start of the season last night against the Indians at Progressive Field, allowing five runs and 10 hits in 6 2/3 innings in a 5-3 loss.

In the first question of his press conference following last night’s outing, Tanaka was evasive when asked what the problem was with his start, which might have been an indication of a problem.

“I do understand the reason why I was struggling today, but it’s really difficult for me to tell you why that was,” Tanaka said through an interpreter. 

Tanaka’s next start was scheduled to come on Sunday against the Orioles in Baltimore; Girardi suggested that he could use Chase Whitley for that outing.

Catcher Brian McCann said that he thought the ball was coming out fine last night, it was just up in the zone.

“The only thing from yesterday is that his pitches didn’t have the same action that they did in the past. I didn’t notice anything,” McCann said.

“You just hope and pray that we get good news and it’s something minor,” said Brett Gardner, who was out of Wednesday’s lineup with a lower abdominal strain. “You worry about anybody, but he’s pretty special, what he’s been able to do the first half of the season.

“I don’t think anybody could tell by watching him last night, I don’t know how long his arm was bothering him or anything like that. He obviously wasn’t himself. Hopefully we get good news.”

 

Kevin Long: “I’m doing everything in my power to try to correct it”

Kevin Long emerged from the coaches’ room after Wednesday’s 6-3 loss to the Rays, prepared to face the music after the Yankees’ season-high fifth straight loss and their ninth in the last 11 games.

The Yankees were just 1-for-9 with runners in scoring position on Wednesday, and though situational hitting has been one of their major concerns of the summer, it has been more difficult than anticipated to make progress in that department.

“You’re always focused on trying to do the little things, trying to score runs and trying to move runners and trying to get guys in,” Long said. “So that’s always a focus.”

Here is a rundown of the group interview that Long conducted in the Yankees’ clubhouse:

On the current issues with the Yankees’ hitters: “You’re obviously not scoring runs and you’re going to put some pressure on yourself. You’re going to try to do a little bit more. The guys are certainly well aware of what’s going on and they’re putting forth as much effort as they can. Just sometimes things don’t go the way you want them or you planned them.”

On being surprised by this, given the names in the lineup: “Yeah, it’s a little surprising. Certainly. You expect some of these guys in this lineup to perform, and at the end of the day and at the end of the year, you hope that those numbers are going to be where they should. I can tell you that they’re doing everything in their power to try to correct it. I’m doing everything in my power to try to correct it, and we’re just going to stay at it. There’s no simple formula. The work is positive and we’re working in the right directions. It’s just been tough.

What can a hitting coach do in this situation?: “You certainly can’t yell, scream or do any of that. It’s more about just staying the course and keep looking at video or maybe working on their swing or tee work, or doing flips or doing extra BP, all those things that you would normally do. Certainly that is something that we’ve really focused on and even you get away from that sometimes and you just see the ball. That’s all Beltran’s doing these last four games, and he’s been really good the last four games, so if he can continue to swing the way he has the last four. It looks like Brian McCann made a positive move today. You have to look at those things and you have to try to move forward on those, because we can’t get anything back that has already happened.”

On Yangervis Solarte needing to make adjustments: “When Solarte was swinging the bat well, he was very aggressive and he was swinging with authority. He’s just a little bit inbetween and a little bit unsure. We looked at his video and he’s a little hard to his front side and he’s just a little tentative. We’ll just stay at that.”

“I don’t think they’re pitching him any differently. He has taken some walks and for the most part swung at good pitches, but I’m sure he’s feeling it, just like a veteran would. He’s a rookie so someone like that will probably put a little more pressure on himself than maybe a veteran would.”

Encouraging signs from the rest of the lineup?: “Obviously, the top three have been pretty good all year, Jeet, Gardner and Ellsbury have swung the bat well. Ichiro has been pretty consistent all year. Teixeira has hit some home runs, driven in some runs. I think the biggest two we’re talking about is if McCann can do what he did today and Beltran — that’s four good games in a row where he’s really had good quality at-bats.

“We’ve kind of changed his routine and changed what he’s done as a DH to try to help that process become really active with him inbetween innings. Walking around, talking about things instead of just sitting in the video room and maybe thinking about an at-bat. So that’s been one adjustment that I think has moved in a positive way for us. So again I just hope that he continues on what he’s doing and McCann today was very positive.”

On Brett Gardner hitting for more power: “Gardy’s made adjustments every year he’s been in this league. He’s basically picked up where he left off last year. He’s an extremely confident individual who continues to get better and better, he’s a very aggressive hitter in the zone. He’s not late. He attacks fastballs and he doesn’t miss them. I think the consistencies of his mechanics in his swing have enabled him to this little power surge that we’ve seen.”

Ever think that maybe this is just what you have?: “It’s about winning games, and we need to do whatever we can to win games. Obviously offense has been an issue all season. These guys understand it, I understand it. We’ve got to turn it around somehow and you’ve got to believe the guys that are in the room, they’re the only guys that can turn it around. Again it’s not from lack of effort, it’s not from not wanting to do it, it’s just one of those things where we need these extra 80 games for guys to prove themselves. McCann is on a mission, Beltran is on a mission. Everybody needs to pick it up a little bit, including the Gardners, including the Ellsburys, and then these guys that have underperformed — they need to pick it up as well.”

On his early expectations for this offense: “I don’t know — obviously more than what we’ve done. Are we capable of scoring 4-5 runs a game? I would say so. Even when we had the powerful offenses, I would think four runs a game was kind of that mark that you shoot for. Jeet said it a bunch of times: let’s win innings, try to score every inning. You start there instead of trying to maybe put up a four spot or five spot all in one inning.”

On drastic changes: “Oh, we’ve done all kinds of stuff. You always make adjustments and always make changes. Nobody here probably even saw what Brian McCann did today. If you just look at his stance, look for a toe tap today and see if you see one. That’s one of those things where if you look at video, you can say see, ‘Whoa, he did make an adjustment.’ You’ll see those adjustments from guys as they go along. They’ll continue to make those adjustments to try to help themselves be more consistent.”

Yankees have officially agreed with nine Draft picks

Here’s a quick update on the players that the Yankees have officially signed from the 2014 First-Year Player Draft:

2B Ty McFarland, James Madison University (10th round, #302), RHP Matthew Borens, Eastern Illinois University (11th round, #332), 1B Bo Thompson, The Citadel (13th round, #392), RHP Joe Harvey, University of Pittsburgh (19th round, #572), C Collin Slaybaugh, Washington State University (26th round, #782), OF Griffin Gordon, Jacksonville State University (27th round, #812), RHP Matt Wotherspoon, University of Pittsburgh (34th round, #1022), 2B Ryan Lindemuth, The College of William & Mary (37th round, #1112), RHP Andre Del Bosque, University of Houston-Victoria (38th round, #1142).

As Lou DiPietro runs down over at YESNetwork.com, the Yankees are making progress with several of their top picks. That group includes second-round left-hander Jacob Lindgren, who has indicated that he intends to sign and is traveling to Tampa for his physical.

“Everybody dreams of playing for the New York Yankees, wear the pinstripes, and it’s just kind of a dream come true,” Lindgren said on a conference call last week. “I never really thought I’d have this opportunity, especially with the Yankees.”

General manager Brian Cashman has indicated that Lindgren would begin his professional career at Class-A Charleston once his deal is complete.

Various reports also have indicated that the Yankees will sign third round right-hander Austin DeCarr, fourth round left-hander Jordan Montgomery and fifth round right-hander Jordan Foley.

The Yankees have also made the following post-draft free agent signings: C Jake Hernandez (University of Southern California), RHP Travis Hissong (Wright State University), and RHP Matt Marsh (Liberty University).

Shawn Kelley returns to Yankees bullpen

Shawn Kelley will return to the Yankees bullpen tonight. Kelley has not pitched in a big league game since May 6 due to a lumbar spine strain, but has re-joined the Yankees in Seattle and has been activated from the disabled list.

In a corresponding roster move, the Yankees optioned right-hander Matt Daley to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

Also prior to tonight’s game, the Yankees acquired left-hander David Huff from the San Francisco Giants in exchange for cash considerations. Huff, a familiar face who was with the Yanks last year, will be used as a multi-inning reliever. Left-hander Wade LeBlanc was designated for assignment.

Yankees GM Brian Cashman: “I think we’re all embarrassed”

Gerry David, Michael Pineda, Derek JeterThere’s plenty to go over from last night’s 5-1 Yankees loss to the Red Sox, which will be remembered as the game that Michael Pineda was ejected in the second inning for having pine tar on the right side of his neck.

As we’ve covered in several other stories on MLB.com, Pineda felt that he was having trouble controlling the ball after allowing two first-inning runs on a cold night. He said that he applied the pine tar before the second inning, even though the Yankees had several conversations with him about the issue following the April 10 incident against the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium.

Several members of the Red Sox said that the issue really wasn’t that Pineda used pine tar to help his control – it’s in violation of Rule 8.02, but it’s something that happens widely in the game, and hitters would prefer that the pitcher knows where the ball is going. The problem was that he was so blatant about it, essentially forcing John Farrell’s hand. There was no way the Red Sox could ignore it; Farrell even said before the game that if Pineda used pine tar, he just hoped it would be a little more discreet.

Pineda was apologetic after the game, manager Joe Girardi was mostly supportive of what he called “bad judgment” on Pineda’s part, and pitching coach Larry Rothschild seemed to be a bit mystified how it had all happened. General manager Brian Cashman offered the most unvarnished take, which we’ll provide a deeper look into right here:

Your reaction to the ejection? “We certainly are responsible, and there’s certainly failure on our part as an organization as a whole that he took the field in the second inning with that on his neck. He’s responsible for his actions, but we failed as an organization for somehow him being in that position. I don’t know how — none of us right now, we’re scratching our head right now, how that took place.”

Was there a conversation with him? “I think it’s probably best to not comment on that, but clearly what took place in the second inning should not be taking place.”

Are you angry with Pineda? “I think we’re all embarrassed. We as a group are embarrassed that this has taken place. I think Michael’s embarrassed. I think we’re embarrassed that somehow he took the field with that in the position like that. It’s just obviously a bad situation, and it clearly forced the opponents’ hand to do something that I’m sure they didn’t want to do, but they had no choice but to do. Obviously we’ll deal with the ramifications of that now.”

Are you more likely to check Red Sox pitchers now? “It’s not anything that’s on our mind. Listen, I would want our manager to do what John Farrell did. I would want, on behalf of our fan base and our team, to do the same thing that they did. Obviously this is a terrible situation that we all witnessed and we’re all a part of and we all have ownership to because there was clearly a failure and a breakdown that he wound up walking out of that dugout with something like that. It’s just not a good situation.”

Why didn’t you know? “I think with television. With television I think the Red Sox probably saw it just like we saw it, but he was already on the field. He didn’t have it in the first inning. He had it in the second inning. There wasn’t anything there in the first inning. He walked out of the dugout in the second inning with it on, and I think by the time everybody saw what was going on, it was too late.”

Did you see it before the umpires? “I personally got a phone call from people watching the game on TV like, ‘Hey, I don’t know what’s going on, but something looks (off).’ So I got out of the stands, walked in, but by the time I made it from the stands in here it was too late.”

Is the problem that he used it or that it was so obvious? “It’s against the rules, let’s leave it at that.”

How could it be so blatant? “We are all responsible. He did what he did, but we are all responsible that he got out of our dugout and was on the field in that manner. We’re all responsible for that situation. Don’t misunderstand that we are a part of putting something on him and stuff like that, but clearly we all have ownership of the fact that that never should have happened.”

Was he told not to do it? “There have been enough conversations. And obviously there will be more now, or there have already been more now, even in-game when he was ejected from the game. I think after the last go-around with the same team, clearly there were a lot of conversations about this. There are no secrets there.”

Should the rule be changed? “That’s for another day. Those are what the rules are that are currently in play. Bottom line is that it’s against the rules, and now we will deal with the consequences.”

Do you expect a suspension? “Yes.”

Your message to Yankees fans? “This is not something that we’re proud to be sitting in, and we’re certainly embarrassed. When he took the field in the second inning, that should never have taken place.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38,694 other followers

%d bloggers like this: