Results tagged ‘ Yankees ’

Pregame briefing: Yankees vs. Rays (Game 143)

The Yankees and the Rays will continue their three-game series tonight here at Yankee Stadium, with left-hander Chris Capuano (2-3, 4.46) getting the start for New York opposite right-hander Jake Odorizzi (10-11, 3.84). First pitch is scheduled for 7:05 p.m. ET; Yankees TV is on YES and Yankees radio is on WFAN 660 AM/101.9 FM.

New York has lost four of seven games on this homestand. Carlos Beltran was scratched from tonight’s lineup around 5:30 p.m. ET with soreness in his right elbow.

Here are the highlights from manager Joe Girardi’s pregame session with the media:

How do you keep your optimism against the bleak playoff odds?

“It’s happened before. It’s very difficult, but it’s happened before. You can only control the things you can control, so go control them. And then worry about where you fall later.”

Pitching for Baltimore series…

Brandon McCarthy in Friday’s first game, TBA in second game (could be a bullpen game with Chase Whitley, Esmil Rogers, Bryan Mitchell, etc.). Shane Greene on Saturday, Hiroki Kuroda on Sunday night.

Brett Gardner update…

“He has the abdominal strain. He’ll be out a few more days at least because that can become something that’s fairly serious. We’re giving him a few more days and we’ll go from there.”

“There’s always concern because of how hard these guys play and the way they play, and speed’s a huge part of their game. Sometimes when you have that type of speed, you’re subject to some injuries. Obviously if you’re a base stealer, you’re going to be subject to more hand injuries and those sort of things. Yeah, it’s a concern, but he has not missed a whole lot of games this year, and he really has played a whole season. He has not been on the DL. I don’t think, if this was (in the middle of) the regular season, I don’t think this would probably be a DL. Not at this point.”

David Phelps update…

“Our hope is to bring him back maybe when we go to Baltimore. He’ll throw a bullpen today. He threw a simulated game, and our hope is to bring him back in Baltimore. He would be in the bullpen, a guy that I could use an inning, inning-plus, then I’d have to give him some days off after that.”

Martin Prado update…

“I don’t want him to do too much running, as I told him. I said, ‘Go through BP, take some BP, see how you feel and we’ll go from there. As I said yesterday, there’s a concern there. I don’t think he’s ready to go, but we’re going to let him take some BP.”

“Our feeling is we’ll get him back, it’s just not today. It’s going to take a few days.”

Masahiro Tanaka update…

“He will throw a bullpen again Friday. He felt pretty good today. He’ll throw in a game Monday in Tampa at the minor-league facility.”

More on last night’s play with Stephen Drew/Rule 7.13…

“I think, to me, the confusion comes for the base runner. I don’t think catchers have changed a whole lot. The confusion comes for the base runner where they’re encouraged to slide. And I understand that, and I’ve said all along I think the intent of the rule is a really good idea, but you worry. You worry about them getting hurt now. And I think that’s the hard part. That’s why I’ve said, let’s go back to the way it was, and if a guy goes out of his way to run over a catcher, you’re suspended.”

Have you told your runners to knock the catcher over?

“If that’s your only choice to score the run. That was allowed last week, two weeks ago. Guys knew that. If that’s your only choice, and you feel that you can knock the ball loose, we’re playing for something. That’s the confusion of the rule. You’re encouraging them to slide, but you also want your guys to play all out and get to a playoff spot. So what do you do?”

How is that different?

“It’s not different. It’s not different. And I’ve told our players, it’s not different. If the guy’s blocking the plate, you’re allowed to run him over. The only thing that was different, in a sense, was if he’s not blocking the plate, don’t run him over, because you are subject to being suspended. The rule, in a sense, for the base runners has not changed. But then again, they’ve been encouraged, we want you all to slide. That’s what the rule was originally going to be, you almost had to slide. But then that became confusing. It will be interesting to see what happens this winter. I’m curious.”

More notes –

Derek Jeter has played in 2,730 games with the Yankees, tied for eighth place on the all-time list of players who have played all of their games with one team…with tonight’s game, he will surpass the Giants’ Mel Ott for sole possession of eighth place all time. 

Over their last six games (since 9/3), Yankees relievers have tossed 20.2 scoreless innings (7H, 3BB, 25K)…marks the longest scoreless stretch by Yankees relievers since a span of 28.0IP from 5/5-15/13 (credit: Elias Sports Bureau). … In their last 17G (since 8/22), have produced a 1.20 ERA (52.2IP, 7ER) and held opponents to a .166 batting average (30-for-181, 12BB, 65K).

Since 8/1, Ichiro Suzuki is batting .342 (25-for-73), the third-highest mark in the AL in that span (min. 70AB).

Martin Prado: “I think everybody dreams to play for the Yankees”

Martin PradoMartin Prado is on his way to Boston’s Fenway Park, where the Yankees plan to use him as their starting right fielder beginning on Friday. Arizona dealt the veteran to New York in exchange for Minor League slugger Peter O’Brien and either a player to be named later or future cash considerations.

Thanks to MLB.com’s Adam Lichtenstein and Steve Gilbert, who are with the D-backs in Arizona and passed along Prado’s reaction to the trade.

Reaction: “I was getting a haircut, and I saw a missed call, and I called back, and it was [Arizona GM Kevin Towers] just letting me know I got traded to the Yankees. I wasn’t surprised. There’s a lot of trade rumors and stuff, but i wasn’t paying attention to that. And it finally happened, and I think it’s just hard to believe how quick I got traded from the Braves and now I got traded again, but that happens. This is a sport where it’s a business, and you never know where you’re going to be next year or the next day.”

“There’s way harder things out there in life than being traded to another team.”

Memorable moments in Arizona: “The support of the fans and how they were willing to let me know how, even in the struggles and bad times or good times, they were there every day. … I felt like in the short period of time, I was part of this family. Unfortunately, I’m heading a different way.”

Hearing from any Yankees: “The only call I had was Brian McCann. I played with him in Atlanta. We chatted for a little bit.”

Being in a pennant race: “I’m just looking forward to trying to find myself in a good position to play baseball. I felt like I’ve been up and down all this year, so now in a new place, we’ll see how things are going to go.”

On the Yankees: “I think everybody dreams to play for the Yankees. And I never expected that in my career.”

On playing outfield: “It happened to me in the past. I played outfield. … I don’t think there’s something that surprised me. Whatever they got me to play, whatever they want me to play, I have to be there, and I’m going to be there for my teammates.”

The anatomy of a rare Yankees-Red Sox trade

Stephen DrewIt takes a specific set of circumstances for the Yankees and Red Sox to pursue a trade together, something that the American League East blood rivals haven’t dared to do since 1997.

As the most marketable pieces of the Red Sox were shipped away on Thursday, their clock rolling ahead to 2015 with Jon Lester, John Lackey and Andrew Miller leaving town, Yankees general manager Brian Cashman wondered if he could get in on the action.

Swapping text messages on Thursday afternoon with Red Sox counterpart Ben Cherington, the clubs quickly hammered out the terms of a deal: infielder Stephen Drew and $500,000 would go to the Yankees in exchange for infielder Kelly Johnson. New York will be responsible for the remainder of Drew’s salary, approximately $5 million.

“The Drew stuff happened today,” Cashman said. “I threw an idea Boston’s way when they started moving and shaking as much as they were. Once they declared themselves the way they did, I floated a text Ben Cherington’s way and we worked really quickly off of that.”

Cherington said that the Yankees were not the first team to inquire about Drew, but the timing was right.

“We had talked to a handful of teams about Drew — teams we thought that might be in need of a shortstop — and it just so happened the Yankees were the team that fit and it fit for them,” Cherington said. “It sounds like he might play a little bit more second base there than short, but we just worked it out today. That one happened obviously late and was the last thing we did.”

The Yankees and the Red Sox had not completed a trade since Aug. 13, 1997, when New York re-acquired catcher Mike Stanley and infielder Randy Brown in exchange for pitcher Tony Armas Jr. and a player to be named later (pitcher Jim Mecir). The Red Sox later flipped Armas to the Expos as part of the Pedro Martinez deal.

Because the Red Sox are looking ahead to next season, the history between the clubs did not raise any red flags for Cherington, who said that he hopes Drew will play well in pinstripes.

“No, given the circumstances –look, we hope it helps them,” Cherington said. “I like Stephen, we all like Stephen. He’s a good player. It hasn’t worked out the way any of us wanted it to, certainly the way I wanted it to. Hope it works out for him there. The Yankee thing wasn’t an issue in that particular conversation.”

The clubs, partners in the legendary Dec. 1919 sale of Babe Ruth, have made just two other deals since George M. Steinbrenner’s 1973 purchase of the team. In March 1986, the Yankees traded outfielder Don Baylor to Boston for outfielder Mike Easler, and in Sept. 1994 the Yankees purchased reliever Scott Bankhead from the Sox.

“One of our two teams has to be in a playoff mode, and the other – in my opinion – has to be rebuilding to some degree. That’s obviously what happened on the last one that our franchises did,” Cashman said. “There’s a great deal of respect between the Red Sox and Yankees, both of our sides. It’s an amazing rivalry, but [we're] certainly very careful when we do business with each other. That’s an obvious statement.”

 


Brian RobertsBrian Roberts played 91 games for the Yankees this year, marking his highest total since 2009, but had produced just two hits in his last 17 at-bats and was held out of the lineup for the team’s last two games going into the Trade Deadline.

The Yankees plan to designate Roberts for assignment to create room for Stephen Drew on the active roster. With 348 plate appearances this season, Roberts’ Yankees tenure will end two plate appearances shy of a $250,000 bonus, but Cashman said the incentive was not a factor in the decision.

“No. Bottom line, it’s all just based on evaluations,” Cashman said. “We’re taking on money [in Drew and Martin Prado]. I had to go to ownership to ask to take on money. Somebody’s performance bonuses — by doing deals where you’re adding to your roster and taking on payroll in a significant way, it has nothing to do with somebody’s roster bonuses.”

Roberts, 36, posted a split line of .237/.300/.360 with five homers and 21 RBIs after signing a $2 million contract in January. Roberts already collected $350,000 in incentives, tied to reaching 250 and 300 plate appearances.

Cashman said that he was appreciative for the contributions from Roberts and Johnson, who was swapped to Boston for Drew.

“These guys, I thank them for their effort and what they brought, and I’m sorry to see them go,” Cashman said. “But at the same time, we’re trying to improve our club. In Drew’s case and Prado’s case, they’re going to assist us as we move forward, and reinforce and improve our chances. It’s just the nature of the beast.”


The Yankees had already expressed reluctance to rush infield prospect Rob Refsnyder to the big leagues, and Thursday’s Trade Deadline deals will help keep the 23-year-old with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

“I’ve been pretty consistent about Refsnyder, that my intention is to have him play his year out at second base,” Cashman said. “I have played a little bit with him in the outfield just in case we had to pull that rip-cord, but now I’ll have him focus solely on second base the rest of the way.”

Refsnyder has posted a split line of .298/.404/.494 in 46 games at Triple-A, with seven homers and 20 RBIs, after starting the year with Double-A Trenton. A fifth-round selection in the June 2012 First-Year Player Draft, Cashman has suggested that Refsnyder could be the Yankees’ starting second baseman in 2015.

“I’ve been pretty consistent and reluctant to bring him up,” Cashman said. “I’d rather him play the whole year out and prepare potentially to take a shot at the roster next year.”


Michael Pineda’s first Minor League rehab start is scheduled to come on Sunday for Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre against Syracuse. Pineda is scheduled to throw four innings and 60-65 pitches, and could need three rehab starts before being big league ready.

Will the Yankees get their reinforcements?

Brian Cashman has said that he has “more work to do” in preparing the Yankees’ roster for a playoff run, and if the general manager is able to cross the finish line on anything, there could be new faces in the clubhouse on Friday at Fenway Park.

Possibilities continue to float with Thursday’s non-waivers Trade Deadline approaching, and while manager Joe Girardi is keeping an eye on transactions around the league, he isn’t counting on anything as an absolute lock to happen with his club.

“Not necessarily, no,” Girardi said. “There’s less than 24 hours if something’s going to happen. You do expect that there’s going to be some movement in baseball. A lot of times there’s more talked about than actually done. We’ll wait to see what happens.”

Cashman has expressed desires for a big bat as well as a starting pitcher; on the hitting front, the Yankees are known to have touched base about the Phillies’ Marlon Byrd and the Twins’ Josh Willingham. The Rangers’ Alex Rios is also on the block.

There have been links between the Yankees and the White Sox about left-hander John Danks, but it appears that interest in bringing the Padres’ Ian Kennedy back to New York was overstated. CBSSports.com reported Wednesday that the Yankees inquired about Padres reliever Joaquin Benoit.

The Yankees have already added starters Brandon McCarthy and Chris Capuano, plus infielder Chase Headley, in deals completed this month.

“We talk about things, but I know that he’s very busy this time of year,” Girardi said. “If something gets close, we usually hear about it. I don’t expect an update every hour. That would drive him crazy and he wouldn’t be able to get anything done. So I just let him do his thing. When he calls me, I say, ‘OK.'”


The Yankees have been able to count on the back end of their season most nights this season, which is why it was so concerning to see Adam Warren, Dellin Betances and David Robertson struggle in succession on Tuesday against the Rangers.

Girardi has tried to give his late-inning hurlers rest whenever possible, but with the team playing so many tight games, that hasn’t been an easy task.

“You hope that off days come at the right time, you get some distance out of your starters, and you’ve just got to manage it,” Girardi said. “I’ll manage it like I have the whole year. You know that you can’t overwork them or you’re not going to get the same production.”

Warren took over for starter Brandon McCarthy in the seventh inning, holding a 10-4 lead, but issued two walks and permitted a hit to leave a bases-loaded situation for Dellin Betances, who served up a grand slam to Texas’ J.P. Arencibia.

“Mechanically, I just felt off,” Warren said. “It was really strange. I usually take pride in my mechanics. I just felt out of sync and couldn’t get on top of the ball. Especially in that situation you want to come in and pound the zone, get some quick outs, and I just couldn’t do that.”

Warren and Betances, converted starting pitchers who have made 48 and 47 appearances, respectively, both said that they do not believe fatigue is an issue. Betances pointed out that he rebounded after Leonys Martin’s triple to record two strikeouts around a walk, escaping the inning.

“I feel good, man. I feel great,” Betances said. “It was a tough one for me. It’s going to happen. Even after I gave up that home run, even after the triple, I was able to hold it right there. It could have been worse.”

Girardi said that he does not plan to use the trio of relievers much differently over the final two months of the regular season.

“We’ve been pretty good about giving them the days when we need the days, giving them two days when they need two days,” Girardi said. “[I'm] looking at what they’ve done in the past and having an idea how many innings they’ve thrown, and just trying to manage it that way.”


One day after Girardi said that Brian Roberts has looked “beat up” to him and could use a couple of days off, the veteran second baseman said that he is dealing with normal bumps and bruises, nothing out of the ordinary.

“I hope it pays off, sure. I’m not 20 anymore,” Roberts said. “Nobody wants days off, but you trust the people in charge to make decisions that hopefully benefit everybody. Hopefully that’s what happens.”

Roberts, 36, is batting .237 with five home runs and 21 RBIs in 91 games. That is Roberts’ highest games played total since 2009 with the Orioles, a fact that Roberts said Girardi pointed out in their pre-game chat Tuesday.

“He said, ‘I just think it’s a good time to give you a couple of days,'” Roberts said. “It’s not my place to argue. I just work here. I’ll play when they put me in the lineup. If Friday is the day, then I’ll be ready to go.”


Brian McCann was out of the Yankees’ lineup on Wednesday, with Francisco Cervelli catching. McCann said that it was just a scheduled day off, and manager Joe Girardi said that he planned it this way to give McCann two days off with Thursday’s travel day.

Girardi said that he was giving Ichiro Suzuki a day off for the same reason, playing Zoilo Almonte in right field.

“I’m sure it will probably help all of our guys at this point in the season,” Girardi said. “As I’ve said, we have some age on our team, and you feel that you have to manage it.”


On this date in 2011, the Yankees scored a franchise record 12 first-inning runs in a 17-3 win over the Orioles, sending 16 men to the plate. 13 reached base, with seven singles, two doubles, a homer, a walk and an error.

“Beat up” Brian Roberts getting a couple of days off

Brian RobertsBrian Roberts has played in 91 games this season, marking his highest total since 2009, and Yankees manager Joe Girardi senses that the veteran second baseman may be wearing down as a result.

“I think that could possibly be going on,” Girardi said. “He’s been beat up pretty good this year physically. He’s answered the bell every day that we’ve called upon him and he’s played hard for us.”

Roberts has two hits in his last 17 at-bats and has reported some aches and pains, according to Girardi, who said that he plans to give Roberts a couple of days off to see if he can re-charge leading into the weekend series against the Red Sox.

“He’s dealing with soreness that players have,” Girardi said. “Legs get beat up, you hit balls off your feet, shins. It’s all part of it.”

Roberts, 36, has posted a split line of .237/.300/.360 with five homers and 21 RBIs in his first season with the Yankees, having signed a one-year, $2 million contract in January.

Staying in the lineup has financial advantages for Roberts, who has 348 plate appearances and is two shy of a $250,000 bonus. Roberts has already collected $350,000 in incentives, tied to reaching 250 and 300 plate appearances.


Michael PinedaThe last time Michael Pineda was healthy enough to face a lineup, he was wearing a smudge of pine tar on his neck, an offense that got the right-hander ejected from an April 23 start at Fenway Park.

That is expected to change on Sunday, when Pineda is being scheduled to get on the mound for one of the Yankees’ farm affiliates, targeting a mid-August return to the big league rotation.

“Four innings and 60 to 65 pitches will be his next move,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “We’re not exactly sure where it’s going to be, they were talking about that today, but it wil be a regular game.”

Pineda, who served a 10-game suspension for the pine tar incident and has been on the disabled list since May 6 with a strained teres major muscle behind his right shoulder, threw 45 pitches on Tuesday in a simulated game at the Yankees’ complex in Tampa, Fla.

It is likely that Pineda would need three Minor League rehab starts before the Yankees would deem him ready for big league action.

“I think you’ve got to get him to where he can go 90 pitches and you feel good about it, where he’s not fatiguing,” Girardi said. “I think if you get there, then he’s a guy you think about.”


As anticipated, Mark Teixeira returned to the Yankees’ lineup at first base on Tuesday. Teixeira pinch-hit in the eighth inning of Monday’s 4-2 loss to the Rangers, his first game action since July 20 because of a lower lat strain and back spasms.

“Pretty easy; I knew where to put him,” Girardi said. “That didn’t take me long. It was good to see that he woke up today and he felt fine.”


Francisco CervelliGirardi said that Francisco Cervelli’s performance over the last week, when Teixeira’s injury pressed Brian McCann into duty at first base, offers a reminder that Cervelli can be a serviceable starting catcher at the big league level.

Cervelli has hit safely in a career-high 10 straight games.

“Great job. I said it last year; Cervy’s talented,” Girardi said. “It’s unfortunate, some of the injuries he’s had – broken hand, broken wrist, concussion. But Cervy’s played for us and he’s played well. He’s been thrown into pennant races and everything. We just need to keep him healthy.”


Kelly Johnson, who was placed on the disabled list July 23 with a strained left groin, is expected to be ready for activation in the minimum 15 days. Johnson may be sent on a Minor League rehab assignment to gather at-bats, and it is likely he will see some increased time at second base down the stretch.

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