Results tagged ‘ Red Sox ’

The anatomy of a rare Yankees-Red Sox trade

Stephen DrewIt takes a specific set of circumstances for the Yankees and Red Sox to pursue a trade together, something that the American League East blood rivals haven’t dared to do since 1997.

As the most marketable pieces of the Red Sox were shipped away on Thursday, their clock rolling ahead to 2015 with Jon Lester, John Lackey and Andrew Miller leaving town, Yankees general manager Brian Cashman wondered if he could get in on the action.

Swapping text messages on Thursday afternoon with Red Sox counterpart Ben Cherington, the clubs quickly hammered out the terms of a deal: infielder Stephen Drew and $500,000 would go to the Yankees in exchange for infielder Kelly Johnson. New York will be responsible for the remainder of Drew’s salary, approximately $5 million.

“The Drew stuff happened today,” Cashman said. “I threw an idea Boston’s way when they started moving and shaking as much as they were. Once they declared themselves the way they did, I floated a text Ben Cherington’s way and we worked really quickly off of that.”

Cherington said that the Yankees were not the first team to inquire about Drew, but the timing was right.

“We had talked to a handful of teams about Drew — teams we thought that might be in need of a shortstop — and it just so happened the Yankees were the team that fit and it fit for them,” Cherington said. “It sounds like he might play a little bit more second base there than short, but we just worked it out today. That one happened obviously late and was the last thing we did.”

The Yankees and the Red Sox had not completed a trade since Aug. 13, 1997, when New York re-acquired catcher Mike Stanley and infielder Randy Brown in exchange for pitcher Tony Armas Jr. and a player to be named later (pitcher Jim Mecir). The Red Sox later flipped Armas to the Expos as part of the Pedro Martinez deal.

Because the Red Sox are looking ahead to next season, the history between the clubs did not raise any red flags for Cherington, who said that he hopes Drew will play well in pinstripes.

“No, given the circumstances –look, we hope it helps them,” Cherington said. “I like Stephen, we all like Stephen. He’s a good player. It hasn’t worked out the way any of us wanted it to, certainly the way I wanted it to. Hope it works out for him there. The Yankee thing wasn’t an issue in that particular conversation.”

The clubs, partners in the legendary Dec. 1919 sale of Babe Ruth, have made just two other deals since George M. Steinbrenner’s 1973 purchase of the team. In March 1986, the Yankees traded outfielder Don Baylor to Boston for outfielder Mike Easler, and in Sept. 1994 the Yankees purchased reliever Scott Bankhead from the Sox.

“One of our two teams has to be in a playoff mode, and the other – in my opinion – has to be rebuilding to some degree. That’s obviously what happened on the last one that our franchises did,” Cashman said. “There’s a great deal of respect between the Red Sox and Yankees, both of our sides. It’s an amazing rivalry, but [we're] certainly very careful when we do business with each other. That’s an obvious statement.”

 


Brian RobertsBrian Roberts played 91 games for the Yankees this year, marking his highest total since 2009, but had produced just two hits in his last 17 at-bats and was held out of the lineup for the team’s last two games going into the Trade Deadline.

The Yankees plan to designate Roberts for assignment to create room for Stephen Drew on the active roster. With 348 plate appearances this season, Roberts’ Yankees tenure will end two plate appearances shy of a $250,000 bonus, but Cashman said the incentive was not a factor in the decision.

“No. Bottom line, it’s all just based on evaluations,” Cashman said. “We’re taking on money [in Drew and Martin Prado]. I had to go to ownership to ask to take on money. Somebody’s performance bonuses — by doing deals where you’re adding to your roster and taking on payroll in a significant way, it has nothing to do with somebody’s roster bonuses.”

Roberts, 36, posted a split line of .237/.300/.360 with five homers and 21 RBIs after signing a $2 million contract in January. Roberts already collected $350,000 in incentives, tied to reaching 250 and 300 plate appearances.

Cashman said that he was appreciative for the contributions from Roberts and Johnson, who was swapped to Boston for Drew.

“These guys, I thank them for their effort and what they brought, and I’m sorry to see them go,” Cashman said. “But at the same time, we’re trying to improve our club. In Drew’s case and Prado’s case, they’re going to assist us as we move forward, and reinforce and improve our chances. It’s just the nature of the beast.”


The Yankees had already expressed reluctance to rush infield prospect Rob Refsnyder to the big leagues, and Thursday’s Trade Deadline deals will help keep the 23-year-old with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

“I’ve been pretty consistent about Refsnyder, that my intention is to have him play his year out at second base,” Cashman said. “I have played a little bit with him in the outfield just in case we had to pull that rip-cord, but now I’ll have him focus solely on second base the rest of the way.”

Refsnyder has posted a split line of .298/.404/.494 in 46 games at Triple-A, with seven homers and 20 RBIs, after starting the year with Double-A Trenton. A fifth-round selection in the June 2012 First-Year Player Draft, Cashman has suggested that Refsnyder could be the Yankees’ starting second baseman in 2015.

“I’ve been pretty consistent and reluctant to bring him up,” Cashman said. “I’d rather him play the whole year out and prepare potentially to take a shot at the roster next year.”


Michael Pineda’s first Minor League rehab start is scheduled to come on Sunday for Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre against Syracuse. Pineda is scheduled to throw four innings and 60-65 pitches, and could need three rehab starts before being big league ready.

The Yankees are not chasing Stephen Drew

The Yankees are saying that they have reached their spending limit for the offseason and consider themselves out on free agent shortstop Stephen Drew, according to a person with knowledge of the situation.

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said last week that the Masahiro Tanaka signing represented the team’s final big splash of the winter, and thus far the organization has been proceeding as though that is the case. Their stance toward Drew has been chilly at best, as the club does not want to commit to a multi-year deal with the 30-year-old infielder, who also has Draft compensation attached because the Red Sox gave him a qualifying offer.

Drew’s name has popped up in connection to the Yankees because of their uncertainty at multiple infield positions. Shortstop Derek Jeter played in just 17 games last year, second baseman Brian Roberts has missed 445 games over the last four seasons and the Yankees are tentatively planning on a third base platoon that will involve Kelly Johnson and Eduardo Nunez.

Quick hits: Gardner’s season may be over

BostonHere are the early notes as the Yankees (79-68) and Red Sox (89-59) get set to kick off a three-game weekend series here at Fenway Park.

Hiroki Kuroda (11-10, 2.99) has the ball for the Yankees, and John Lackey (9-12, 3.48) goes for Boston. It was raining here this afternoon, but the tarp is off the field and we should start on time. Temperatures are right around 70 degrees, dropping as the night goes on.

  • Bad news, if not completely unexpected, for Brett Gardner. Gardner has been diagnosed with a Grade 1 strain of his left oblique, and as you know, obliques are a tricky injury to figure out. Joe Girardi acknowledged that it is possible Gardner has played his last regular season game. There is some hope that Gardner could return as a pinch-runner before he can be a full player, but that depends on how this all heals. Girardi said that he wouldn’t expect to have Gardner back for the upcoming Blue Jays series, but he could be back for the playoffs if the Yankees get that far.
  • Curtis Granderson is taking over for Gardner in center field, and he’s hitting leadoff tonight. Girardi said that he can move that around as the weekend goes on, but Granderson has had the flexibility to hit in seven different lineup spots this season so it’s not really anything new. Granderson has homered in two straight games, sending rockets out to Eutaw Street in Baltimore the last two nights.
  • Austin Romine took some swings today and felt OK, but they’ll be very cautious bringing him back from a concussion. It’s possible Romine won’t be available to play all weekend.
  • Boone Logan may have turned a corner in his rehab of a left elbow injury, as Girardi said that Logan felt better and wants to try playing catch again. It didn’t go well yesterday, as Logan said he shut down the session after about five tosses.
  • Alex Rodriguez is scheduled to play third base tomorrow. He’s DHing tonight. Girardi said that once he gets A-Rod back to third base, he could go either way with Eduardo Nunez or Brendan Ryan at shortstop.
  • Who’s closing tonight? That’s a “great question,” Girardi said. It won’t be Mariano Rivera or David Robertson, apparently, though I guess you can never say that for sure. Rivera has pitched in four of the Yanks’ last five games but didn’t rule out campaigning to pitch if needed. 
  • Girardi on the Baltimore scorer’s decision to credit Rivera with a win instead of a save last night: “I’d like to see him get a save, but when I woke up this morning, it didn’t change my life.”

My Beat The Streak picks today: Doubling down with Ichiro Suzuki (33-for-110 vs. Lackey) and Lyle Overbay (11-for-30 vs. Lackey). The streak is at zero, and you know what? I’m beginning to think that a run at Joe D. isn’t happening. There’s always 2014.

Quick hits: Jeter out at least two days with sore ankle

Here are the early notes as the Yankees (75-67) and Red Sox (86-58) prepare to meet here at Yankee Stadium for the finale of a four-game series. Hoping to avoid the sweep, the Yankees give the ball to Hiroki Kuroda (11-10, 2.99), while the Red Sox counter with Jon Lester (13-8, 3.88). It’s a gorgeous Sunday afternoon in the Bronx; partly cloudy and temperatures in the low 80s.

Derek Jeter, Mike NapoliWe haven’t yet heard from Derek Jeter, but Joe Girardi said the working plan is to shut Jeter down for at least two days due to a sore left ankle. The CT scan came back negative and that’s an encouraging sign, so the Yankees haven’t yet given any thought to shutting Jeter down for the rest of the season.

He hasn’t looked quite right on either side of the ball, though, so Dr. Robert Anderson is taking a look at the scan results down in Charlotte. Bottom line for Jeter: the ankle problem is something that is continuing to linger. No wonder he called this season a “nightmare” last month.

“[This season is] probably his worst one ever for him, to have to live through this, and you can probably go back to when he started when he was six years old,” Girardi said. “He loves to be out there and he loves to compete. And this is the time that he probably loves being out there more than any. It’s been difficult.

“… He’s been dealing with it. He understands. I know he’s frustrated and he wants to be out there. It’s tearing him up inside. As much as he doesn’t like it and he wants to be out there, I think he understands our point of view about trying to give it a couple of days to calm down.”

Brett Gardner is on the bench today, but there’s no injury problem with him. Girardi said he is sitting Gardner because he is 2-for-11 lifetime vs. Lester.

Shawn Kelley is available in the Yankees bullpen today. David Robertson and Boone Logan are not; they feel better but aren’t able to play catch yet.

The Yankees have not made any changes to their rotation, so for the moment, David Huff is still on track to start Thursday against the Orioles in Baltimore.

Girardi’s take on the Red Sox’s improvement in 2013: “They’re healthy. That’s the biggest difference. They’re healthy. They had to deal with a lot of injuries last year to all parts of their club. It wasn’t like, when you look at them offensively, they had guys who forgot how to hit. You had guys that were not in the lineup a lot, and that’s the biggest difference.”

As noted yesterday, the Yankees have lost three straight games in which they have scored seven or more runs for the first time in franchise history, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Here’s some more historical factoids, if you can bear them, as provided by the Yanks:

PITCHING NOTES: The Yankees have allowed at least 12R in consecutive games for the first time since 7/17-18/96 (12R on 7/17 at Boston and 16R on 7/18 at Milwaukee) and in back-to-back games vs. one opponent for the first time since 8/27-28/88 at California (12R on 8/27 and 13R on 8/28)…have done so in consecutive home games for the first time since 8/3-12/60 (12R on 8/3 vs. Detroit and 12R on 8/12 vs. Washington)…marks the first time doing so in consecutive home games on the same homestand since 8/4-6/29 (14R in Game 2 on 8/4 vs. Cleveland and 13R in Game 1 on 8/6 vs. Washington)…since the Yankees began calling New York home for the 1903 season, the only other time they had allowed at least 12R in consecutive home games to the same team in the same series was 6/28/1907 (16-5 loss) and 7/1/1907 Game 1 (16-15 win) vs. Washington.

Yeesh.

My Beat The Streak pick today: Ichiro Suzuki, who is leading off today and is 14-for-41 (.341) lifetime vs. Lester. The streak is at zero after Curtis Granderson went hitless yesterday.

Quick hits: Yanks try their luck with Huff

Here are the early notes as the Yankees (75-66) and Red Sox (85-58) prepare to meet here at Yankee Stadium for the third game of a four-game series that has been just heartbreaking thus far for the home team. The Yanks turn the ball over to lefty David Huff (2-0, 3.32) as he moves from the bullpen to the rotation, while the Red Sox aren’t making things much easier by presenting a tough customer in right-hander John Lackey (8-12, 3.22).

David HuffSending Huff to the mound is Joe Girardi‘s way of going with the hot hand. He has earned the start with his recent stellar work out of the bullpen, and even Phil Hughes could see the writing on the wall that the Yankees were beginning to lean toward seeing if they can catch lightning in a bottle with Huff.

“I haven’t seen anything that would tell me he can’t give you some distance and throw the ball well,” Girardi said of Huff. “That’s all he’s done since he’s been here, so I think 90 to 100 pitches, I expect that from him, but you have to see the quality of pitches once you’re up around that mark.”

Alex Rodriguez is not in the Yankees lineup this afternoon. Girardi said that he has Rodriguez available to pinch-hit, and that, “He’s fine, it’s just six days in a row, day game after a night game.” Eduardo Nunez is at third base in place of A-Rod.

Who’s in the bullpen behind Huff? Brett Marshall would be the long man, and Girardi said that he could “piece it together” with Dellin Betances and right-hander Jim Miller, who was added to the roster on Saturday after spending this season at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. You won’t see Joba Chamberlain or Preston Claiborne today. Mariano Rivera should be available.

“You pretty much know the pieces that you have going in, so you look at that,” Girardi said. “Huff’s thrown the ball well, so I have confidence in him. It’s no different than any other day when you don’t have a couple of guys that you can use in your bullpen.”

No word yet on Boone Logan, who had a date with an MRI tube this morning.

My Beat The Streak pick today: Curtis Granderson, who is starting today as the DH and is 8-for-21 lifetime vs. Lackey. The streak is currently at seven games after Eduardo Nunez went 2-for-3 last night.

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