Results tagged ‘ Michael Pineda ’

Yankees GM Brian Cashman: “I think we’re all embarrassed”

Gerry David, Michael Pineda, Derek JeterThere’s plenty to go over from last night’s 5-1 Yankees loss to the Red Sox, which will be remembered as the game that Michael Pineda was ejected in the second inning for having pine tar on the right side of his neck.

As we’ve covered in several other stories on MLB.com, Pineda felt that he was having trouble controlling the ball after allowing two first-inning runs on a cold night. He said that he applied the pine tar before the second inning, even though the Yankees had several conversations with him about the issue following the April 10 incident against the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium.

Several members of the Red Sox said that the issue really wasn’t that Pineda used pine tar to help his control – it’s in violation of Rule 8.02, but it’s something that happens widely in the game, and hitters would prefer that the pitcher knows where the ball is going. The problem was that he was so blatant about it, essentially forcing John Farrell’s hand. There was no way the Red Sox could ignore it; Farrell even said before the game that if Pineda used pine tar, he just hoped it would be a little more discreet.

Pineda was apologetic after the game, manager Joe Girardi was mostly supportive of what he called “bad judgment” on Pineda’s part, and pitching coach Larry Rothschild seemed to be a bit mystified how it had all happened. General manager Brian Cashman offered the most unvarnished take, which we’ll provide a deeper look into right here:

Your reaction to the ejection? “We certainly are responsible, and there’s certainly failure on our part as an organization as a whole that he took the field in the second inning with that on his neck. He’s responsible for his actions, but we failed as an organization for somehow him being in that position. I don’t know how — none of us right now, we’re scratching our head right now, how that took place.”

Was there a conversation with him? “I think it’s probably best to not comment on that, but clearly what took place in the second inning should not be taking place.”

Are you angry with Pineda? “I think we’re all embarrassed. We as a group are embarrassed that this has taken place. I think Michael’s embarrassed. I think we’re embarrassed that somehow he took the field with that in the position like that. It’s just obviously a bad situation, and it clearly forced the opponents’ hand to do something that I’m sure they didn’t want to do, but they had no choice but to do. Obviously we’ll deal with the ramifications of that now.”

Are you more likely to check Red Sox pitchers now? “It’s not anything that’s on our mind. Listen, I would want our manager to do what John Farrell did. I would want, on behalf of our fan base and our team, to do the same thing that they did. Obviously this is a terrible situation that we all witnessed and we’re all a part of and we all have ownership to because there was clearly a failure and a breakdown that he wound up walking out of that dugout with something like that. It’s just not a good situation.”

Why didn’t you know? “I think with television. With television I think the Red Sox probably saw it just like we saw it, but he was already on the field. He didn’t have it in the first inning. He had it in the second inning. There wasn’t anything there in the first inning. He walked out of the dugout in the second inning with it on, and I think by the time everybody saw what was going on, it was too late.”

Did you see it before the umpires? “I personally got a phone call from people watching the game on TV like, ‘Hey, I don’t know what’s going on, but something looks (off).’ So I got out of the stands, walked in, but by the time I made it from the stands in here it was too late.”

Is the problem that he used it or that it was so obvious? “It’s against the rules, let’s leave it at that.”

How could it be so blatant? “We are all responsible. He did what he did, but we are all responsible that he got out of our dugout and was on the field in that manner. We’re all responsible for that situation. Don’t misunderstand that we are a part of putting something on him and stuff like that, but clearly we all have ownership of the fact that that never should have happened.”

Was he told not to do it? “There have been enough conversations. And obviously there will be more now, or there have already been more now, even in-game when he was ejected from the game. I think after the last go-around with the same team, clearly there were a lot of conversations about this. There are no secrets there.”

Should the rule be changed? “That’s for another day. Those are what the rules are that are currently in play. Bottom line is that it’s against the rules, and now we will deal with the consequences.”

Do you expect a suspension? “Yes.”

Your message to Yankees fans? “This is not something that we’re proud to be sitting in, and we’re certainly embarrassed. When he took the field in the second inning, that should never have taken place.”

Yankees’ rotation appears to be set

Masahiro Tanaka, Ivan NovaThe Yankees have set their likely starting rotation for the season-opening series against the Astros in Houston, which projects to send Masahiro Tanaka out for his big league debut on April 4 against the Blue Jays in Toronto.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi confirmed to reporters on Monday that the club has scheduled CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda and Ivan Nova for starts in the April 1-3 series in Houston. That would permit Tanaka to fly ahead of the team and be waiting to start on April 4 at Rogers Centre.

Tanaka, 25, signed a seven-year, $155 million contract with the Yankees this past offseason, and he has posted a 3.00 ERA in four spring outings, spanning 15 innings. The Yankees have been mindful of easing him into the workload of a five-man rotation after Tanaka pitched once per week for the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles in Japan.

By lining up to pitch the Yanks’ fourth game of the year, Tanaka would gain an extra day of rest his third time through the pitching order. The decision also splits up Kuroda and Tanaka, as Girardi has noted that their pitching styles are similar.

If the Yankees can stay on rotation, Tanaka would line up to make his first Yankee Stadium start on April 9 against the Orioles, then be back on the mound in the Bronx for the April 15 game against the Cubs.

Girardi said that the Yankees have also reached a decision on their fifth starter, but he was not prepared to announce it publicly “because we haven’t talked to everyone involved.”

“I would love to tell you everything, but I haven’t talked to the guys and it’s not fair,” Girardi said.

An official announcement is expected on Tuesday, but it is believed that Michael Pineda won the job after going 2-1 with a 1.20 ERA in four spring games (three starts). In 15 innings, Pineda permitted three runs (two earned) and 14 hits, walking one and striking out 16.

Girardi said that “it’s possible” the Yankees could keep all three of the rotation runner-ups in the bullpen to begin the season. David Phelps, Adam Warren and Vidal Nuno have also been in competition to serve as the fifth starter.

“The important thing to me is taking what we feel is the best 12 guys,” Girardi said. “It’s something we’ve got to talk about a little bit [Tuesday].”

The manager added that the Yankees are close to naming the backup to starting catcher Brian McCann. Francisco Cervelli is believed to be well in the lead, having batted .455 (15-for-33) with four home runs and seven RBIs in 13 spring games.

“That’s another thing we may wait to announce, but we’re pretty sure of what we’re going to do,” Girardi said.

In other updates, outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury (sore right calf) is scheduled to play in a Minor League game on Tuesday at the Yankees’ Himes Avenue complex, and infielder Brendan Ryan (pinched nerve) received treatment on Monday.

Girardi has said that if Ryan is unavailable to play on Tuesday, he would likely begin the season on the disabled list, opening a spot on the Yankees’ Opening Day roster for another backup infielder.

In that event, Girardi has said that he would take two of three from the group of Eduardo Nunez, Dean Anna and non-roster invitee Yangervis Solarte, all of whom could serve as a backup to shortstop Derek Jeter.

Yanks trust Nova to kick off pivotal Sox series

Ivan NovaIt’s the beginning of an 11-game obstacle course that could very well determine if the Yankees have a chance at the postseason or not. Is this the most important stretch of the season? Sure feels like it.

Here are the early notes as the Yankees (75-64) and Red Sox (84-57) prepare to meet here at Yankee Stadium, with right-handers Ivan Nova and Jake Peavy matching up for the 7:05 p.m. ET start:

Who would the Yankees rather have on the mound than Nova, the reigning American League Pitcher of the Month? Nova went undefeated in six August starts, going 4-0 with a 2.08 ERA, and now he’ll look to continue that success into September.

“When you’re throwing the baseball like he is, you probably should feel some confidence out there,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “He’s getting his strikeouts when he needs them, he’s getting a lot of ground ball outs, and that’s important in a park like this when you’re playing a team like this.”

Asked to expand on what Nova is doing differently than he was last season, Girardi responded:

“He learned to command his fastball down in the zone. Not worrying so much about hitting corners, but just having it down in the zone with movement. I think that has been really, really important to him. I also think the consistency of his curveball came back when he started throwing it a lot more, and he’s thrown his changeup a little bit as well. Maybe not 20 percent of the time or 30 percent of the time, but he has thrown it and gotten strikes, and it’s just another look when you’re going through a lineup the second, third or fourth time.”

The Yankees have been saying for days that they do not expect there to be any carryover from the last time these two clubs met, when right-hander Ryan Dempster earned a five-game suspension by intentionally throwing at Alex Rodriguez.

Those Sunday night events fired up the Yankees, who have gone 12-5 since the drilling. Yet for those expecting Nova to throw at David Ortiz or something along those lines, there might be disappointment. These games are so important to the Yankees that winning will likely be the main priority.

“No. We’re not looking to [retaliate],” Robinson Cano said. “We’re just going to go out there [tonight], play the game the right way that we have always been, and what’s in the past we’re going to keep in the past.”

OK. OK. What else would you have expected him to say? Stay tuned, but it doesn’t sound like Major League Baseball or the umpires plan on getting involved pre-game.

A few injury updates to pass along: Zoilo Almonte (ankle) is playing seven innings tonight for Double-A Trenton in their playoff game and is the most likely player to rejoin the big league club this month. Travis Hafner has done one simulated game, while Kevin Youkilis is only taking dry swings and is “the least probable” of the aforementioned three players to return in 2013.

Also, David Phelps and Michael Pineda are up to the bullpen stage, but it doesn’t sound like either one is coming back this year. Phelps might be back as a reliever in late September but that’s sounding more like a long shot, and the Yankees have been pretty mum on Pineda’s progress.

One last thought from Girardi:

“The big thing is you have to continue to play well. And as you look at it, we have a chance to control our own destiny, because we’re really three behind them in the loss column, and we have three games with. We have to play well. That’s the bottom line. So I don’t think you can get too caught up in what they’re doing, because there are other teams that are around us as well.”

My Beat The Streak pick tonight: Robinson Cano, who gets the honors for a second straight night after he went 3-for-4 against the White Sox last night. Cano is 3-for-7 vs. Peavy. My streak is at five, halfway to my season-high of 10.

Thursday’s camp notes: Youk “always a Red Sock”

Kevin Youkilis, David OrtizIt’s probably not the best way to endear yourself to a new fan base, but hey, let’s at least give Kevin Youkilis some points for honesty.

The new Yankee and former Red Sox third baseman briefly stopped by George M. Steinbrenner this afternoon to check out his locker assignment and drop off a few items, spotting his No. 36 jersey hanging alongside a few pairs of pinstriped pants.

This is the new reality for Youkilis, who is clean-shaven to satisfy team regulations and sounded like a Yankee when he said that he’s just here to “go out there every day and play hard and try to win a World Series.”

Oh, but nothing in the fine print of his one-year, $12 million deal with the Yankees mandated that he must put his Red Sox history through the shredder, and so Youkilis made it clear that part of him will always belong in Boston.

“To negate all the years I played for the Boston Red Sox and all the tradition, you look at all the stuff I have piled up at my house and to say I’d just throw it out the window — it’s not true,” Youkilis said. “I’ll always be a Red Sock.”

That quote won’t win Youkilis many friends among a fan base that, judging by early Internet reaction, seems to be unconvinced about his addition. But here’s what might win them over: if Youkilis is healthy and productive for New York, the same blue-collar qualities that made Youkilis such a frustrating opponent over the years are exactly what Yankees fans have been asking for.

Think about it — how many times have we heard the talk-radio rants that the Yankees need more players with Paul O’Neill’s brand of intensity, the unbridled fury it takes to assault a bat rack or water cooler without a second thought about the millions watching at home? Youkilis can be that guy. In other words…

“I’ll never be Alex Rodriguez,” Youkilis said. “I mean, Alex Rodriguez is one of the best hitters of all-time. I’m not going to be that same guy. But I can be a good Major League player who can help the team win, and that’s all you’ve got to do.”

Here’s some more of Thursday’s notes and quotes from Tampa:

  • Newly acquired right-hander Shawn Kelley is expected to join the team shortly after being traded by the Mariners on Wednesday evening. Kelley is a power arm with a plus slider and figures to compete with Cody Eppley for a bullpen role. He has a Minor League option remaining, so he could also start the year at Triple-A.
  • Don’t leave the lights on for Alex Rodriguez here in Tampa; Brian Cashman said that A-Rod will not join the Yankees at any time this spring. He’s supposed to arrive in New York tomorrow from Miami to continue his rehab, so it sounds like the earliest anyone might see him around the ballpark is April 1 against the Red Sox.
  • As we discussed earlier on the blog, Michael Pineda has progressed to throwing full mound sessions and the Yankees are optimistic that he could be helping at the big league level in late May or June. A lot can happen between now and then, and setbacks are an expected part of the process, but he’s on track so far. Pineda will start throwing to hitters in March, but isn’t expected to pitch in any Spring Training games.
  • Dellin Betances took a step backward last season, but the Yankees haven’t given up hope on the hulking right-hander, hoping that a good showing in the Arizona Fall League can right his ship. Cashman said that the power, physicality and stuff are all there for Betances. One glaring problem has been fastball command, which is why Betances found himself demoted to Double-A Trenton last year.
  • Ivan Nova said he doesn’t know why his strikeout rate jumped to 8.1 per nine innings last season after he posted 5.3 strikeouts per nine innings in 2011. He said he was just trying to pitch his game, not worrying about strikeouts. The number that still bothered Nova was his 5.02 ERA; the Yankees have scored him plenty of runs, but that’s too many to ask.
  • Funny note from Girardi, who was recounting the uncomfortable moment he had to tell Nova that they were leaving him off the playoff rosters last year: “It’s not like he flipped my desk over or I felt threatened, but I could see the disappointment. I have a pretty big desk.”

Pineda drops 20 pounds, could help Yanks in June

Michael PinedaThere’s a little bit less of Michael Pineda in Yankees camp this spring. He said that he weighed in at 260 pounds, down from 280 a year ago, and that his rehab is going well.

“Everything is doing well. Everything has been good,” Pineda said. “I’m feeling very excited, I’m feeling good. My shoulder is stronger right now.”

Pineda just started throwing off a full mound and is not expected to pitch in a game this spring, but he’ll start facing hitters next month under controlled conditions. The best case scenario that the Yankees are tossing out is that Pineda could be a realistic big league option in June.

“He’s had no setbacks, he’s worked hard and it’s a very serious surgery he’s coming back from,” Yankees GM Brian Cashman told reporters. “No guarantees, but so far we’re cautiously optimistic.”

Pineda said that he is confident that he will be able to return as the same power pitcher he was with the Mariners and regrets showing up out of shape for his first spring as a Yankee.

“I won’t make this mistake anymore,” he said.

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