Results tagged ‘ Mark Teixeira ’

Pregame briefing: Last home series for Derek Jeter

Hello from Yankee Stadium, where the Yankees and Orioles will play the first game of their four-game series this evening at 7:05 p.m. ET. The Yankees are still mathematically alive, so this series has meaning, but it looked as though it might carry a whole lot more a month or two ago when the Yanks were talking about mounting a run for the division crown. The Orioles can clinch home field advantage in the AL Division Series tonight, so that’s something.

You can watch on YES or listen on WFAN 660 AM/101.9 FM.

Other updates from the Yankees clubhouse:

  • The Yankees have claimed outfielder Eurys Perez on waivers from the Nationals, and he’ll be with the team tomorrow. Perez gives the Yanks another bench player who can play all three outfield spots and pinch-run, which could come in handy since Jacoby Ellsbury’s hamstring is keeping him out of action. Girardi said that Ellsbury still has some blood at the top of the hamstring, so he’s unable to run.
  • The Yanks designated left-hander Josh Outman for assignment in a corresponding move; on his way out the door to make room for Perez. Outman stopped by Derek Jeter’s locker and asked for three autographed baseballs.
  • Jose Pirela will make his Major League debut tonight as the Yankees’ designated hitter, meaning the Yankees will have used 57 different players in 2014. That shatters the club record of 56, which was set all the way back in 2013… and that tells you a lot about these last two years. If Perez gets in, they’d have used 58.
  • Masahiro Tanaka was “all smiles” today, according to Girardi, and that means he is on track to pitch Saturday against the Red Sox at Fenway Park.
  • Mark Teixeira (right wrist) had a cortisone injection, his third of the year, and hopes to be in the lineup tomorrow against Baltimore.
  • Carlos Beltran (elbow) is still feeling discomfort and probably isn’t available tonight.
  • CC Sabathia (right knee) played catch on Monday, the first time he has done so since having knee surgery in July … at least, officially. Sabathia admitted he has been playing catch and tossing around a football recently out of boredom, but at least now he doesn’t have to sneak around.

Pregame briefing: Masahiro Tanaka returns

Masahiro TanakaHello from Yankee Stadium, where the Yankees and Blue Jays will play the finale of their weekend series this afternoon at 1:05 p.m. ET. The Yankees are clinging to faint hopes in the postseason race, but they’ll be getting a good look at their 2015 plans when Masahiro Tanaka heads to the mound to make his first start since July 8 in Cleveland, having rehabbed a partial tear of his right ulnar collateral ligament.

The Yankees are curious about what they’ll have in Tanaka, and seeing him under big league conditions against the Blue Jays (and, if all goes well, probably the Red Sox at Fenway Park) could tell them a lot about if he can be counted on.

“I think it’s important for us as an organization and for him to see what we have moving forward, so I’ve been looking forward to this day,” Joe Girardi said.

There aren’t too many sure things in the ’15 rotation right now, so if Tanaka looks like he did in the first half, maybe that tempers the urgency to throw wheelbarrows of cash at guys like Jon Lester or Max Scherzer this winter.

You can watch on YES or listen on WFAN 660 AM/101.9 FM.

Other updates from the Yankees clubhouse:

  • Derek Jeter could play in all of the Yankees’ remaining games, Girardi said, especially now that he is swinging the bat well. Jeter is DHing this afternoon and comes in with three straight multi-hit games, one shy of his longest stretch of the season. Jeter is 6-for-13 with two runs, a double, a homer and two RBIs on his final regular season homestand.
  • Carlos Beltran (bone spur in right elbow) said that he has been encouraged to wait until after the season to have surgery. The recovery time is approximately 12 weeks, so in theory, waiting another week or so shouldn’t have much impact on his availability for Spring Training. He will have the surgery, that’s 100 percent, but perhaps he could help off the bench as a pinch-hitter in the last games of the year.
  • Jacoby Ellsbury (right hamstring strain) still hopes to get back on the field this year. He spent all day yesterday icing and said that he is working on a plan with the Yanks’ trainers. Girardi said that Ellsbury could probably pinch-hit before playing center field, but he’s probably not available today.
  • Mark Teixeira (right wrist tendinitis) will see a doctor after today’s game and said that he will ask about getting a third cortisone injection. Girardi said that Teixeira is not a player for him today.
  • Chaz Roe was designated for assignment to make room on the 40-man roster for Tanaka, who was activated from the 60-day disabled list.

Brian McCann placed on seven-day concussion DL

The Yankees have placed catcher Brian McCann on the seven-day concussion disabled list. McCann was struck in the face mask by a Mike Aviles foul tip in the third inning on Friday, and was replaced by a pinch-hitter in the sixth inning.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi said that McCann seemed to be feeling “foggy” between innings. Austin Romine has been recalled from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.


With two Minor League rehab starts under his belt, Michael Pineda said that he is ready to rejoin the Yankees rotation, giving manager Joe Girardi a choice to make in advance of next week’s showdown with the division-leading Orioles.

Pineda fired 4 1/3 innings of one-run ball on Friday evening for Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre against Columbus, showcasing a fastball that sat between 92 and 94 mph as well as a swing-and-miss slider.

“Everything is good,” Pineda said on Saturday. “My pitches are there, my velocity is there. I’m feeling good and I’m happy with that.”

Pineda threw 72 pitches in the outing, scattering six hits while walking none and striking out seven. He said that he has not been told where his next start will be, but feels prepared to face big league hitters.

“I’m feeling great. Everything is normal,” Pineda said.

The Yankees had said that they wanted Pineda to reach 90 pitches in a Minor League rehab start before activating him, but David Phelps’ injury has changed the landscape.

Esmil Rogers pitched well in a spot start on Friday, holding the Indians to a run over five innings. Girardi said that Pineda and Rogers will both have throw days on Sunday, providing the option of handing the ball to either pitcher on Wednesday in Baltimore.

“That’s something that we’ll have to talk about,” Girardi said. “(Pineda’s) next start, he could go to 90, but we’ll sit down and we’ll talk about it.”


Mark Teixeira said that it was “very painful” to attempt hitting off a tee and that he is not able to correctly grip the bat, but the Yankees first baseman is hopeful that he will be able to avoid the disabled list.

Teixeira sustained a laceration to his left pinky finger in Wednesday’s 5-1 Yankees victory over the Orioles, requiring three stitches. He said the cut is healing, but he is still only swinging at about 50 percent.

“The joint is really, really sore, and so whether it was sprained or bruised, we’re not sure exactly,” Teixeira said. “But the joint is really sore. The cut, you just wrap it up and you play. The joint, I can’t grip the bat.”

Yankees manager Joe Girardi said that Teixeira took some light batting practice in the underground cages on Saturday and reported some improvement.

“He felt better today; he took swings and felt better, so hopefully it’s not much longer with him and we’ll just take it day by day,” Girardi said.

Teixeira said that swinging would affect him more from the right side of the plate. Girardi said that if it appears that Teixeira would be out for six to seven days, the Yankees would give thought to placing him on the disabled list.

“Right now it’s working, what we’re doing,” Girardi said. “But we’ll just wait and see.”


The Yankees announced Saturday that they have unconditionally released infielder Brian Roberts, who was designated for assignment on Aug. 1. Roberts batted .237 with five homers and 21 RBIs in 91 games for the Yankees this season.

“Beat up” Brian Roberts getting a couple of days off

Brian RobertsBrian Roberts has played in 91 games this season, marking his highest total since 2009, and Yankees manager Joe Girardi senses that the veteran second baseman may be wearing down as a result.

“I think that could possibly be going on,” Girardi said. “He’s been beat up pretty good this year physically. He’s answered the bell every day that we’ve called upon him and he’s played hard for us.”

Roberts has two hits in his last 17 at-bats and has reported some aches and pains, according to Girardi, who said that he plans to give Roberts a couple of days off to see if he can re-charge leading into the weekend series against the Red Sox.

“He’s dealing with soreness that players have,” Girardi said. “Legs get beat up, you hit balls off your feet, shins. It’s all part of it.”

Roberts, 36, has posted a split line of .237/.300/.360 with five homers and 21 RBIs in his first season with the Yankees, having signed a one-year, $2 million contract in January.

Staying in the lineup has financial advantages for Roberts, who has 348 plate appearances and is two shy of a $250,000 bonus. Roberts has already collected $350,000 in incentives, tied to reaching 250 and 300 plate appearances.


Michael PinedaThe last time Michael Pineda was healthy enough to face a lineup, he was wearing a smudge of pine tar on his neck, an offense that got the right-hander ejected from an April 23 start at Fenway Park.

That is expected to change on Sunday, when Pineda is being scheduled to get on the mound for one of the Yankees’ farm affiliates, targeting a mid-August return to the big league rotation.

“Four innings and 60 to 65 pitches will be his next move,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “We’re not exactly sure where it’s going to be, they were talking about that today, but it wil be a regular game.”

Pineda, who served a 10-game suspension for the pine tar incident and has been on the disabled list since May 6 with a strained teres major muscle behind his right shoulder, threw 45 pitches on Tuesday in a simulated game at the Yankees’ complex in Tampa, Fla.

It is likely that Pineda would need three Minor League rehab starts before the Yankees would deem him ready for big league action.

“I think you’ve got to get him to where he can go 90 pitches and you feel good about it, where he’s not fatiguing,” Girardi said. “I think if you get there, then he’s a guy you think about.”


As anticipated, Mark Teixeira returned to the Yankees’ lineup at first base on Tuesday. Teixeira pinch-hit in the eighth inning of Monday’s 4-2 loss to the Rangers, his first game action since July 20 because of a lower lat strain and back spasms.

“Pretty easy; I knew where to put him,” Girardi said. “That didn’t take me long. It was good to see that he woke up today and he felt fine.”


Francisco CervelliGirardi said that Francisco Cervelli’s performance over the last week, when Teixeira’s injury pressed Brian McCann into duty at first base, offers a reminder that Cervelli can be a serviceable starting catcher at the big league level.

Cervelli has hit safely in a career-high 10 straight games.

“Great job. I said it last year; Cervy’s talented,” Girardi said. “It’s unfortunate, some of the injuries he’s had – broken hand, broken wrist, concussion. But Cervy’s played for us and he’s played well. He’s been thrown into pennant races and everything. We just need to keep him healthy.”


Kelly Johnson, who was placed on the disabled list July 23 with a strained left groin, is expected to be ready for activation in the minimum 15 days. Johnson may be sent on a Minor League rehab assignment to gather at-bats, and it is likely he will see some increased time at second base down the stretch.

Mark Teixeira hoping for two healthy months

Mark Teixeira took on-field batting practice Monday for the first time since he sustained what the Yankees called a lower lat strain, and the first baseman hopes to return to the lineup on Tuesday against the Rangers at Globe Life Park.

“I’m very happy,” Teixeira said. “The back spasms are gone, which I’ve been dealing with for a long time, so that’s really good. It’s good to see that the treatments worked and the time off helped, so hopefully they won’t come back.”

Teixeira has not played since July 20 against the Reds; he had a platelet-rich plasma injection and at the time, the team said that he would miss three to four days. It has been longer than initially anticipated, but Teixeira has at least been able to avoid the 15-day disabled list.

“I wasn’t expecting all the little annoying things that come up. That’s part of the game,” Teixeira said. “Hopefully this is it, and I have two healthy months to finish the season, but missing a couple of games here, a couple of games there, it’s never fun.”

Teixeira said that last season’s wrist injury made him consider his baseball mortality, and the fact that he could no longer play through injuries that he might have in his 20s.

“I’ve played through so many things. I can’t play through them anymore,” Teixeira said. “That’s just the fact of the matter. The guys ask me, ‘How did you play in Texas for five years, 100 degrees every night?’ I was young. I was a kid. I played through everything.

“You fouled a pitch of your leg, go get ‘em. Strain something in your back, go get ‘em. That’s just the way it is when you’re young. I can’t play through those things (now). I don’t think I would have had to miss games with back spasms.”

Teixeira said that maintenance will be a key for him, and that he’d prefer to play until something hurts rather than take precautionary days off. But it’s pretty much inevitable at this stage that sooner or later, there will be another issue to deal with; as he said with a smile, “Father Time is undefeated.”

“I was very lucky that I could play through those things and stay on the field as long as anybody,” Teixeira said. “But at a certain point, you hit a wall. I hit a wall last year and hopefully I won’t have a lot of these, but if they do pop up, it’s just harder to play through it.”


Joe Girardi has more of an inside track to the Yankees’ trade rumor scene than the average observer, but the manager said that he prefers to give general manager Brian Cashman his space to work, rather than get excited about moves might happen.

“We talk on a daily basis anyway during the course of the day, so it doesn’t really change much,” Girardi said. “I know he’s always trying to improve our club, and I’m not going to keep bothering him and take up his time when there’s things he’s doing.”

Cashman has said that he has more work to do in what has been a busy July; upgrading starting pitching is a focus, but various media reports have also connected the Yanks to discussions of some level for outfielders Marlon Byrd (Phillies), Chris Denorfia (Padres), Alex Rios (Rangers) and Josh Willingham (Twins).

Girardi often says that he has to worry about the 25 players in his clubhouse, but he does regularly communicate his views on the roster and specific needs to Cashman, something that will continue even after Thursday’s non-waivers Trade Deadline.

“I try not to get excited, because as I always say, it takes two teams to really want to do a deal,” Girardi said. “And do I expect it? I never expect to get new people. I always think, ‘This is who we’ve got, this is who has to get it done.'”


The Yankees recalled outfielder Zoilo Almonte from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Monday, immediately inserting the 25-year-old to play left field and bat ninth against the Rangers.

It is Almonte’s third stint with the big league club this year, where he has batted .160 (4-for-25) with one homer. Almonte was batting .281 in 75 games at Triple-A, leading the RailRiders in homers (16) and RBIs (57).

In a corresponding roster move, the Yankees designated left-hander Jeff Francis for assignment, reducing the number of active pitchers on the staff to 12.

Francis was 1-0 with a 5.40 ERA in two relief appearances, spanning 1 2/3 innings. He was acquired from the Athletics with cash considerations for a player to be named later on July 11.


Jacoby Ellsbury received a day off for rest on Monday against the Rangers. Ellsbury had played in all 10 of the Yanks’ games coming out of the All-Star break, batting .289 (11-for-38) with a double and two homers on the homestand. He said manager Joe Girardi told him about the day off on Sunday’s flight to Texas.


Masahiro Tanaka (partially torn right ulnar collateral ligament) stayed back in New York to continue receiving treatment at Yankee Stadium. Aug. 4 will mark three weeks of full rest since the right-hander received a platelet-rich plasma injection.

“We’re still waiting for that three-week mark. Nothing’s really going to change until the three week mark,” Girardi said. “He’s staying back and doing treatment every day. He feels better and better. You just kind of wait to see where you are after three weeks.”


Carlos Beltran (bone spur in right elbow) has increased to throwing at 100 to 120 feet. The Yankees are hopeful that Beltran, currently only a designated hitter, could return to play some outfield after this road trip.


Michael Pineda (strained muscle in upper back) is scheduled to throw three innings or 45 pitches in a simulated game on Tuesday in Tampa, Fla. The Yankees are hopeful that Pineda can rejoin the big league roster in mid-August.

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