Results tagged ‘ Larry Rothschild ’

Yankees pitching coach Larry Rothschild talks Mo, Pineda, CC, Kuroda, Pettitte

Yankees pitching coach Larry Rothschild appeared on the MLB Network Radio channel on SiriusXM on Friday, joining hosts Jim Duquette and Jeff Joyce. Here are some highlights:

On Michael Pineda:

Host/Jeff Joyce:  “What is his status and is he a guy you are expecting or hopeful that will be healthy for you this season?”

Larry Rothschild:  “With elbows it is a lot more predictable and you can expect.  With shoulders, really, I think you take him off the radar screen, bring him back as the injury allows.  But I don’t think we can count on him for next year at all.  And hopefully he comes back and it’s a great addition but if you count on him and think he’s going to be back by a certain point you have a pretty high percentage of being disappointed with that.  So I think you’re better off just approaching it that he’s not going to be back next year.  And if things go right – and he certainly could come back and be able to pitch, I wouldn’t doubt that at all – but for us to count on him, I think, would be a mistake.”

On Mariano Rivera:

Rothschild:  “At the very end of the season I didn’t even think about it.  I thought for sure he’s coming back because of the rehab he’s done and everything he’s done leading up right until the very end of the season.  Really, when I got home I heard that now there’s talk that he may not come back and may retire.  But I don’t know.  I would bet anything that he’s coming back.  But I have not talked to him.  I’ve kind of left him on his own because I think it’s a decision he has to make.  I will probably talk to him in the next week or 10 days or so.  But there are no parameters.  Cash will handle that part of it as far as when he’s going to come back, when the decision is made if he’s not, and we’ll go from there.”

On CC Sabathia:

Joyce:  “Has there been talk about lightening the load a little bit during the regular season based on the load that he’s taken on over the last five, six, seven years?”

Rothschild:  “Yeah, Joe and I talked about it even going back to last year.  This year we talked about it even more.  Not only lightening the load but the pitch total during the game because he’s a guy that almost thrives on working the pitch totals and when he doesn’t have them it has an effect leading into the next start.  Unlike a lot of guys where if they get a little more rest they’re more effective, he works more and throws more pitches he seems to get on rolls a lot quicker.  And what happened, I think, part of this year is he didn’t do it.  We didn’t let him get to that point.  And then with the groin at one point and the elbow at the other we just never got to that point until towards the end and then he got on another roll when he did throw the pitches.  So it’s kind of a Catch-22 with him.  We do have to watch it and we’re going to probably have to watch a few guys on this staff.  We’re aware of it and back off.  When he had a chance to pitch with extra rest we did that.  In the past he would pitch on the fifth day almost all the time.”

On Hiroki Kuroda:

Host/Jim Duquette:  “Do you think there’s a high percentage chance he comes back to you guys?”

Rothschild:  “I think there’s a high percentage chance that if he plays in the States he plays with the Yankees.  I think he enjoyed the experience.  I think his decision, to some degree, is going to be: Is this the year for him to go back to Japan?  He feels like he has a debt to the team in Japan that he played for, that he would like to pitch, I think, another year for them before he retires.  Whenever that comes about I think when he thinks he’s ready to do that that’s what he’s going to do.  And if he’s not then I think we have a good chance to re-sign him and he’ll play for us or, you know, possibly the Dodgers.  I don’t know.  But I know he enjoyed New York and I think if he’s going to play in the States we’re going to have a pretty good shot at bringing him back.”

On Andy Pettitte:

Duquette:  “Do you think he wants to come back to the Yanks?”

Rothschild:  “Yeah, I do.  But I think it’s a decision that when you get home, at the end of the year I would have told you, ‘Yes, absolutely.’  And now I think he still will but, you know, you just don’t know at this time of year.  I think it is his decision again and he’ll sit down with the family and I think the family is pretty much on board with it so, yeah, I think the fires are still there.  It was a freak thing, getting hit with the ball and the fracture of the bone this year.  Can he hold up for 36 starts?  I’m more comfortable thinking a little bit less than that. … I think effectively, if we’re smart about it, he’s going to be more effective with a few less starts than trying to push it through to 32 or 35, whatever it might be, and keep him fresher as long as we can.”

If Phil is right, do the Yankees need Ubaldo?

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — That’s the question I’m pondering from St. Pete, just a few hours before the start of a four-game series against the Rays and just a few hours removed from a very convincing start by Phil Hughes.

Hughes looked awfully close to that 18-game winner from 2010 against the Blue Jays on Sunday, when he notched his first win and first quality start, retired eight of his final nine hitters he faced and registered just 80 pitches through six innings. He could’ve gone longer, but Hughes (pictured left by The Associated Press) went deep enough to make a very important point — he looks like an effective starting pitcher again.

Over the All-Star break, the right-hander worked with pitching coach Larry Rothschild on better aligning his stride towards the plate and adjusting his curveball grip. That grip gave him a much sharper breaking ball he was able to use as a reliable No. 2 pitch to offset his four-seamer (one that consistently sat in the 92- to 93-mph range and got better as the game wore on).

Now, the question: If Hughes truly is back, and he’s the 2010 version again, do the Yankees need Ubaldo Jimenez?

Here’s the thing about Jimenez: Rockies general manager Dan O’Dowd doesn’t really have to move him. It reminds me a lot of the situation with Padres closer Heath Bell in recent years. Jimenez is under club control for a while (signed through 2012 with two additional club options thereafter), he’s awfully affordable (making no more than $8 million through 2014) and his stock is rather low (Jimenez is 5-8 with a 4.08 ERA in 18 starts this year — though he does have a 2.56 ERA since the start of June).

Since the Rockies are 9 1/2 games out of first place and the starting-pitching market is weak, it’s not surprising they would shop him. But considering all the above-mentioned factors, it’s no wonder Colorado seeks the sun and the moon for the services of Ubaldo (pictured right by the AP).

MLB.com colleague Thomas Harding says the Rockies are at least listening to offers for Jimenez, but a deal remains unlikely. Peter Gammons, meanwhile, put the chances of a deal at 10 percent. We all know how quickly things can change as the non-waiver Trade Deadline draws closer, though.

With regards to the Yankees, the names that have surfaced as potential pieces to a deal are the likes of Manny Banuelos, Dellin Betances, Ivan Nova and Jesus Montero (though SI.com is reporting today that Montero wouldn’t be the centerpiece of the potential trade, since the Rockies don’t view him as a catcher).

Now, if Hughes is right, then the Yankees would have an in-house rotation of CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett and Hughes at the top, with the final spots going to any two between Bartolo Colon, Freddy Garcia and Nova.

Would they still need Jimenez to make a return trip to the playoffs? And would it be worth it to give up what the Rockies would want in return?

Curious to hear your thoughts.

Some links from the series finale in Toronto …

* Efficient Hughes looks strong in first win

* Yankees Notebook, on Gardner, Dickerson, Teixeira and A-Rod

* Yankees intend to push Rays down standings

Alden 

Yankees name Larry Rothschild as pitching coach

The Yankees have filled their pitching coach vacancy, and the choice is a wild card that wasn’t on many lists – Larry Rothschild, who leaves the Cubs to head to the Bronx. 
Here is the official Yankees press release:
YANKEES NAME LARRY ROTHSCHILD AS PITCHING COACH
 
The New York Yankees today announced they have signed pitching coach Larry Rothschild to a three-year contract.  The 2011 season will mark Rothschild’s 37th season in professional baseball as a player, coach or manager.  He has served on the Major League coaching staff for two World Championship clubs – the 1990 Cincinnati Reds and 1997 Florida Marlins.
 
Rothschild, 56, joins the Yankees after serving as the Chicago Cubs pitching coach from 2002-10.  Over the nine-year stretch, the Cubs pitching staff combined to lead the Majors in strikeouts (11,604).  Cubs pitchers led the Majors in strikeouts in each of his first seven seasons as the club’s pitching coach through 2008, including a still-standing single-season Major League-record of 1,404 strikeouts in 2003.
 
He began his coaching career as a roving minor league pitching instructor for the Cincinnati Reds from 1986-89, before joining the Major League staff as bullpen coach from 1990-91 and then pitching coach from 1992-93.  Rothschild then served as roving minor league pitching instructor for the Atlanta Braves in 1994, before taking on the role of pitching coach for the Florida Marlins from 1995-97.
 
Rothschild was named the first manager in Tampa Bay Devil Rays history on November 7, 1997, and remained in the position until April 18, 2001, compiling a 205-294 managerial record over the stretch.  Under his guidance, the club’s winning percentage increased each of his three full seasons with the organization.
 
Originally signed by the Cincinnati Reds as a non-drafted free agent in 1975, Rothschild’s minor league playing career spanned 11 seasons from 1975-85 with the Cincinnati and Detroit organizations, going 66-46 with a 3.96 ERA in 387 appearances (80 starts).  He made seven Major League relief outings (all with Detroit in 1981 and ’82), recording a 5.40 ERA with one save and no decisions (8.1IP, 5ER, 8H, 8BB, 1K, 1HR).
 
The Chicago, Ill., native graduated from Florida State University with a degree in business management.
 
“Larry brings a wealth of invaluable experience to our team and to our pitching staff,” Yankees Manager Joe Girardi said. “He’s a championship pitching coach, and I’m excited to add Larry’s abilities to our staff.  He is above all else an excellent teacher, who brings a professional attitude and a keen sense of preparation to his craft.  I’m very much looking forward to working with him moving forward.”
 
“Larry will be a welcome addition to our pitching staff. He comes with an impressive resume as a former Major League manager and a world champion pitching coach. He has a great reputation with his players, who know they can trust him and rely on him to put them in a position to succeed,” said Yankees General Manager Brian Cashman.
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