Results tagged ‘ Brian Cashman ’

Yankees GM Brian Cashman trying to upgrade offense

Brian CashmanThe reconstructed Yankees rotation has performed better than Brian Cashman would have anticipated, and the general manager said that he’d now prefer to focus his attention on acquiring a big bat as the July 31 non-waivers Trade Deadline approaches.

“It’s weird,” Cashman said in an interview with ESPN New York 98.7 FM. “Our pitching has been drastically altered because of the injuries, and despite losing four out of five starters and all that stuff, our pitching has survived – surprisingly, to this point. I think our offense should be better.

“… It still feels like the pitching needs more help, but honestly the offense has been consistently poor throughout the entire year. The answer has to be an offensive piece, I guess.”

The Yankees believe they upgraded their infield this week by acquiring Chase Headley from the Padres, but they could also use a right-handed hitting outfielder. The Twins’ Josh Willingham makes some sense as a potential trade target, as does the Rangers’ Alex Rios.

Brett Gardner and Jacoby Ellsbury have been constants in the Yankees’ outfield this year, but 40-year-old Ichiro Suzuki has faltered with regular playing time and the team still isn’t sure if Carlos Beltran will be able to return to defensive duty this year because of a bone spur in his throwing elbow.

Cashman also said that he does not see homegrown 23-year-old Rob Refsnyder as the answer to help a lineup that has produced 395 runs through 100 games; only the Astros (394) have scored less among American League teams this season.

Refsnyder has enjoyed some buzz at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, where he had a .301/.401/.497 slash line entering play on Thursday, but Cashman said that he does not believe Refsnyder would represent a significant upgrade over Brian Roberts at second base right now.

“He has a chance to be the second baseman of the future maybe as early as next year,” Cashman said, adding that if Refsnyder does see any big league time in 2014, it would likely be in the outfield. “If we can avoid it, I don’t think we’d get the impact over the next two months that people would think. That jump from Triple-A to the big leagues is larger than it’s ever been.”


Masahiro Tanaka is still reporting discomfort in his right elbow, 10 days after having a platelet-rich plasma injection, but the Yankees are still hopeful of having the right-hander return to the big league mound this season.

Tanaka was diagnosed with a small tear of his right ulnar collateral ligament earlier this month. Three doctors recommended a six-week rehab program instead of having Tanaka undergo Tommy John surgery.

“He’s improved, but he still feels it,” Cashman said. “On a daily basis, it decreases, so that’s good. But it’s not good that he’s still feeling it at this stage. We just go day by day and week by week, and we’ll adjust accordingly. Right now, it’s too early to call.”

The Yankees have said that Tanaka would have three weeks of rest from throwing, so he would likely attempt to resume playing catch in the first week of August. After that, Tanaka would have to go through the gauntlet of bullpen sessions, batting practice and then Minor League rehab games to get back to the big leagues.

“We’ve got to wait three weeks to see where he’s at,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “Then we’ll probably have him start to have him play catch and see if he’s going to be a pitcher for us. You’ve got to let things heal. Things don’t heal overnight.”


Manager Joe Girardi said that the Yankees will likely make a roster decision regarding injured first baseman Mark Teixeira by Friday.

Thursday’s series finale against the Rangers will be Teixeira’s fourth consecutive game out of the lineup due to a mild strain of his lower left lat. After Sunday’s 3-2 win over the Reds, Teixeira underwent an MRI exam that revealed the injury.

“It’s just seeing how he feels after three or four days,” Girardi said. “Then we’ll decide if we think it’s going to be the near future that he would play or we’re going to need the 15-day [disabled list]. If it’s going to be 12, 13, 14 days, it probably makes sense to get a player here.”


Because of rain in Tampa, Fla., Michael Pineda’s simulated game was moved indoors on Thursday morning. The rehabbing right-hander threw 30 pitches, with no hitters. He will progress to throwing three innings or 45 pitches against live hitters in five days.


Derek Jeter was out of the Yankees’ lineup on Thursday; Girardi said that it was a regular day off, and that if it had been a night game, Jeter probably would have played.

Yankees GM Brian Cashman: “I think we’re all embarrassed”

Gerry David, Michael Pineda, Derek JeterThere’s plenty to go over from last night’s 5-1 Yankees loss to the Red Sox, which will be remembered as the game that Michael Pineda was ejected in the second inning for having pine tar on the right side of his neck.

As we’ve covered in several other stories on MLB.com, Pineda felt that he was having trouble controlling the ball after allowing two first-inning runs on a cold night. He said that he applied the pine tar before the second inning, even though the Yankees had several conversations with him about the issue following the April 10 incident against the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium.

Several members of the Red Sox said that the issue really wasn’t that Pineda used pine tar to help his control – it’s in violation of Rule 8.02, but it’s something that happens widely in the game, and hitters would prefer that the pitcher knows where the ball is going. The problem was that he was so blatant about it, essentially forcing John Farrell’s hand. There was no way the Red Sox could ignore it; Farrell even said before the game that if Pineda used pine tar, he just hoped it would be a little more discreet.

Pineda was apologetic after the game, manager Joe Girardi was mostly supportive of what he called “bad judgment” on Pineda’s part, and pitching coach Larry Rothschild seemed to be a bit mystified how it had all happened. General manager Brian Cashman offered the most unvarnished take, which we’ll provide a deeper look into right here:

Your reaction to the ejection? “We certainly are responsible, and there’s certainly failure on our part as an organization as a whole that he took the field in the second inning with that on his neck. He’s responsible for his actions, but we failed as an organization for somehow him being in that position. I don’t know how — none of us right now, we’re scratching our head right now, how that took place.”

Was there a conversation with him? “I think it’s probably best to not comment on that, but clearly what took place in the second inning should not be taking place.”

Are you angry with Pineda? “I think we’re all embarrassed. We as a group are embarrassed that this has taken place. I think Michael’s embarrassed. I think we’re embarrassed that somehow he took the field with that in the position like that. It’s just obviously a bad situation, and it clearly forced the opponents’ hand to do something that I’m sure they didn’t want to do, but they had no choice but to do. Obviously we’ll deal with the ramifications of that now.”

Are you more likely to check Red Sox pitchers now? “It’s not anything that’s on our mind. Listen, I would want our manager to do what John Farrell did. I would want, on behalf of our fan base and our team, to do the same thing that they did. Obviously this is a terrible situation that we all witnessed and we’re all a part of and we all have ownership to because there was clearly a failure and a breakdown that he wound up walking out of that dugout with something like that. It’s just not a good situation.”

Why didn’t you know? “I think with television. With television I think the Red Sox probably saw it just like we saw it, but he was already on the field. He didn’t have it in the first inning. He had it in the second inning. There wasn’t anything there in the first inning. He walked out of the dugout in the second inning with it on, and I think by the time everybody saw what was going on, it was too late.”

Did you see it before the umpires? “I personally got a phone call from people watching the game on TV like, ‘Hey, I don’t know what’s going on, but something looks (off).’ So I got out of the stands, walked in, but by the time I made it from the stands in here it was too late.”

Is the problem that he used it or that it was so obvious? “It’s against the rules, let’s leave it at that.”

How could it be so blatant? “We are all responsible. He did what he did, but we are all responsible that he got out of our dugout and was on the field in that manner. We’re all responsible for that situation. Don’t misunderstand that we are a part of putting something on him and stuff like that, but clearly we all have ownership of the fact that that never should have happened.”

Was he told not to do it? “There have been enough conversations. And obviously there will be more now, or there have already been more now, even in-game when he was ejected from the game. I think after the last go-around with the same team, clearly there were a lot of conversations about this. There are no secrets there.”

Should the rule be changed? “That’s for another day. Those are what the rules are that are currently in play. Bottom line is that it’s against the rules, and now we will deal with the consequences.”

Do you expect a suspension? “Yes.”

Your message to Yankees fans? “This is not something that we’re proud to be sitting in, and we’re certainly embarrassed. When he took the field in the second inning, that should never have taken place.”

Eduardo Nunez designated for assignment by Yankees

The Yankees have designated Eduardo Nunez for assignment, and that’s the 40-man move to add Yangervis Solarte to their roster. Nunez will now be exposed to waivers, and a trade could very well be in the works.

Here’s Brian Cashman’s explanation of the move:

“Tough call, but he’s the way I went. It’s just a tough call. We thought through a lot of other different permutations but I think it’s best for right now to give him a new fresh start and we’ll see where that takes him. We’re allotted 10 days to make an assignment of his contract, so stay tuned.”

In response to a follow-up question about what the Yankees did not see from Nunez this spring, Cashman said:

“In this most recent spring, he had a good spring but we had other guys that had better ones. He possesses a great deal of talent and you can dream on him – and we have – as a potential every day shortstop in the big leagues. All that talent is still there and I think his versatility does provide for a great deal of choices as a player on a Major League roster. We’ll see what develops in the next 10 days.

“Obviously when we had him coming up through the system, he was someone that projected to be utilized as an everyday player in the big leagues. At 27 years old, that doesn’t mean that can’t still happen. We had that hope that maybe he could develop into something like that as a choice, and at worst a player that the manager in the Major Leagues could utilize different ways. Right now, we’re going to go a different direction and we wish him the best as we look through the next 10 days of making some decisions. So we’ll see.”

And on Nunez’s future as a Major League player, Cashman said:

“I know he wants to be in the big leagues, no question about it. He wants to be playing in the big leagues. I can understand that. It’s less to do with Eduardo and as much to do with what Dean Anna and Solarte showed this spring. Listen, we were fortunate to have everybody come into Spring Training on the infield side and do very well. It put a wrinkle in our decision-making process, and so here we are. These guys have provided us with choices, so we made those choices. It’s more about what Anna and Solarte showed, and not necessarily as much about Eduardo. We try to celebrate what those guys did in the competition rather than what Nuney didn’t.”

Yankees notes & quotes from the Winter Meetings

The Yankees have had a busy two days here at the Winter Meetings, but thus far they have not been able to cross the finish line on any deals. General manager Brian Cashman is hopeful that they will leave Walt Disney World with at least one player in the fold, but he also understands that it is just as likely they’ll be able to continue conversations once the team contingent returns to New York.

Here’s a rundown of quick hits from yesterday’s coverage:

  • Plenty of teams are calling about Brett Gardner. The Yankees are listening, but not shopping him. Cashman said he has also received calls on Ivan Nova, Gary Sanchez and J.R. Murphy. The Yankees like having two players who could patrol center field in Gardner and Jacoby Ellsbury.
  • The Yankees are moving on from Robinson Cano. Joe Girardi acknowledged that Cano wasn’t happy batting second last year. Cashman said that for $240 million, he would have done the same thing.
  • Joe Torre is about to have his number retired. New Mets outfielder Curtis Granderson took a good-natured swipe at his former team.
  • The Yankees have checked in with free agent third baseman Mark Reynolds. Cashman said he could see a right-handed batter platooning with Kelly Johnson at third base, but the Yankees also could play Johnson at second base or in the outfield.
  • A starting pitcher is more likely to be signed via free agency than acquired by trade. The top free agent starters are currently judged to be Matt Garza, Ervin Santana and Ubaldo Jimenez. Like the rest of the league, the Yankees are waiting for clarity on the Masahiro Tanaka situation. Girardi named David Phelps, Adam Warren, Michael Pineda and Vidal Nuno as rotation candidates.
  • The Yankees asked the Reds about Homer Bailey, and were told no.
  • Cashman refused to speak to the Carlos Beltran situation, as Beltran’s contract is still not official. Speaking in general terms, Cashman said that the Yankees like the flexibility of a power switch-hitting combination like they’ve been accustomed to with Bernie Williams/Jorge Posada or Nick Swisher/Mark Teixeira.
  • Having a healthy Teixeira back at first base upgrades the Yankees, Cashman said. He still sees question marks at second base, third base and shortstop, though Joe Girardi said that Derek Jeter is “having a normal offseason” and “feels great.”
  • Girardi said that he is “not sure” how Ichiro Suzuki will be used. The Yankees would move Ichiro, who is due $6.5 million in 2014. The Giants aren’t a fit.
  • The Yankees are looking for bullpen help, both righties and lefties. They’re in touch with Boone Logan. Girardi sees David Robertson, Shawn Kelley and Preston Claiborne in the pen right now.
  • Michael Pineda is coming in healthy and will compete for a rotation spot. Gil Patterson saw him a month ago in the Dominican and reported that Pineda is “in great shape,” Cashman said.
  • Manny Banuelos, if healthy, is expected to be at Triple-A.

We’ll have updates throughout the day. Stay tuned to MLB.com, Yankees.com and my Twitter account (@bryanhoch) for more Winter Meetings coverage.

Carlos Beltran joins the Yankees on a dizzying day of spending

(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Did everyone forget that the Winter Meetings are coming up next week down in Florida? Should I cancel my flight? The Hot Stove is in a full-blown boil, and I honestly cannot remember a 48 to 72 hour period of so much frenzied activity and player movement in December.

If you thought the fun was over on Friday, then Carlos Beltran and the Yankees had something to say about it, agreeing to a three-year, $45 million pact that finally dresses the switch-hitter in pinstripes. Beltran’s arrival comes nearly a full decade after he offered his services to the Yankees at a reduced rate, only to join the Mets when the Bombers said they were sticking with Bernie Williams as the center fielder.

The deal comes as a direct result of Robinson Cano’s decision to accept a 10-year, $240 million pact from the Mariners. Cano finally scored the decade-long deal he coveted and wasn’t going find from the Yankees, who finished with an offer that is believed to have been seven years at $175 million.

I was surprised. I do believe that Cano wanted to stay with the Yankees, and I don’t think he linked up with Jay-Z and this Roc Nation Sports venture to establish his brand in the Pacific Northwest. He will probably talk about all of that at some point in the future, but few people would leave $65 million on the table. He had made it clear that there would be no hometown discount, and the Yankees weren’t budging. So, Seattle it is.

This was a day that started by watching the sun come up over Connecticut, strangely enough. Brian Cashman was on the roof of the Landmark Building in Stamford, practicing his rappelling once again for Sunday’s upcoming ‘Heights & Lights’ holiday event. Cashman checked his cell phone a few times and ducked behind a storage room to make a few calls, but he said that he hadn’t been briefed about any of the developments between Cano and the Mariners.

Twitter filled in the gaps: the Cano deal was reportedly on late at night, reportedly off during breakfast, then reportedly finalized before lunch. Cashman shrugged during the coffee and donut hours — the Yankees had made their proposal and felt comfortable with it, and if it was not good enough, they still had offers out to other free agents. Some of those balls in the air would find their way to the Bronx.

“Everybody is replaceable,” Cashman said. “That’s a team concept. Some people are harder to replace than others, no doubt about it. I don’t think anybody would have the attitude that anybody is going to make or break your future, but you certainly can invest for good reason into players that can try to make your future brighter. That’s what we’re trying to do with Robbie amongst others. If it’s not to be, it’s not to be, and we’ll continue to do business as we have and try to collect as many great players as we can.”

Cashman had said that the Yankees were “on the one-yard line” with more than three players, shaking his head when asked to identify them. We can fill in the gaps: Hiroki Kuroda (one year, $16 million), Kelly Johnson (one year, $3 million) and Ellsbury (seven years, $153 million, still not official). Somewhere in the middle of all this, Curtis Granderson became a Met.

Now Beltran is in the Bronx, and there’s more to come. The Yankees want to add another starting pitcher, bullpen help, support for the left side of the infield and – oh yeah – a second baseman.

No one should be surprised to hear free agent Omar Infante’s name pop up for that last need. No, he’s not Cano – players of that caliber are few and far between. But the Yankees intend to move on, and what’s more, they already appear to be well on their way.

So, yep, I’ll keep that flight to Florida. I want to see what happens next.

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